The Two Tribes of Digital: Do You Push or Protect?

The Two Tribes of Digital: Do You Push or Protect?

As a parent of two young children I have noticed that many parents fall into two simple categories in terms of how they parent:

1. The "Pushers" - Parents who incorporate their children into their lives and take them everywhere they would normally go and push them into activities. The general notion being that kids will naturally follow the guidance of their parents do many things and try many activities.

2. The "Protectors" - The belief that kids are only kids for a short period of time and they should enjoy being a kid without the pressure of too many activities and having to be rushed around town trying to do too much. Why push kids into something; let them discover it on their own.

Of course, this is a simple comparison and can often be much more nuanced, but for the purposes of this topic, I see the same similarities and instincts when it comes to marketing and more specifically the adoption of digital marketing and social media in Rx/Dx organizations.

There are the Pushers the people that are early adopters, who want to push, be inventive, and make a difference with this new way of communicating. These are the folks who are paving the way, creating new strategies when nobody asked them to, they are defining the rules of the road and in the end are the innovators and risk takers within the organization.

Then you have the Protectors who don't necessarily see or understand the benefits of moving to digital and social media. They don't see the value in trying new things when the old tried and true methods seem to still be working. These folks toe the line and have to be shown why doing it a new way is valuable. The burden of proof is on YOU to show them versus them taking initiative to understand on your own.

You have to understand that you must always be in education mode.

So the question is, which category do you fall into? A favorite quote of mine is, "risk, fate and luck always favors action over inaction." So, you can probably tell what category I favor.


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The Devil is in the Details

The Devil is in the Details


Most people have the will to win, few have the will to prepare to win. Bobby Knight

The rise of digital and social media has created increased fragmentation and complexity for marketing. Today the devil is absolutely in the details and you must have an overarching, coherent strategy, that yes, is detailed.
Sub-strategies need to be developed for the many facets of digital, which are many. Web sites, micro sites, SEM, Display, Social, Mobile, Apps, Promotions, Content, etc. It's a lot to consider.

So, you might be wondering what my point is? There seems to be very little tolerance for detail today in large organizations and with executive ranks in many organizations. When it comes to Digital, there is virtually no tolerance for detail and only small group of people that understand it. That is a problem.

To provide some contrast to that notion, consider this: Dr's are constantly learning, working with peers and exchanging information. Venture Capitalists are some of the most detailed and knowledgeable across multiple domains about business, marketing, company and product viability. Jack Welch, considered by many to be the best CEO ever, famously and routinely took deep dives into businesses. So why is there a gap in digital and most executives today when digital is impacting the entire enterprise?

If you are a leader, let's take it from the customer perspective and ask yourself if you are driving change that enables the organization and employees to provide the type of customer experience that you expect from other companies?

If you're not, you should. It's the details, that matter.

| www.jlefevere.com | www.thedigitalstrategist.com | If you liked this post consider adding a comment or subscribing to the feed for frequent updates.