Fixing the Five Bad Habits of Traditional Marketers

Fixing the Five Bad Habits of Traditional Marketers

Great post from Christopher Stutzman from Forrester. Recommended reading. If leadership is making the tough decision, we need more leadership. 



  • Complacency. Marketers who are complacent leave their brand exposed and vulnerable to the competition. Blockbuster ignored the road signs pointing to consumers’ desires to bypass the video store in favor of more convenient formats. Meanwhile, Netflix and Redbox seized the opportunity to create new channels of distribution.
  • Conformity. Marketers who play follow-the-leader lose their ability to differentiate themselves. While major airlines like Delta, United, and American have flirted with bankruptcy by providing the lowest common denominator of service, others like Southwest, JetBlue, and Virgin America are having success by straying from the norm and offering more leg room, checking luggage without charging extra fees, and providing in-flight Wi-Fi.
  • Analysis paralysis. Marketers who get overwhelmed trying to measure and validate every decision often end up missing opportunities. This is especially true when it comes to social media, where McDonald’s and Dunkin' Donuts hesitated before engaging in it. Meanwhile, their staunchest competitor, Starbucks, dove in head first and has grown its social media presence with every success and failure to become the only brand with more than 10 million Facebook fans and more than 1 million Twitter followers.
  • Hands-off management. Traditional practices of top-down management leave the brand detached and distanced from consumers. BP’s command-and-control approach to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill revealed how out of touch the company’s leadership was to local consumers. Meanwhile, Best Buy empowers more than 1,500 employees to be the voice and face of the brand by directly addressing customer issues through the Twelpforce.
  • Silos of knowledge. Marketers who are overly reliant on silos of product specialization usually stifle creativity and collaboration. This limits the company’s ability to innovate in new categories, much like Microsoft that struggles to expand its market-share leadership outside of its core business. In contrast, Google operates under a mandate of innovation across the entire company, enabling employees to spend 20% to 30% of their time on dreaming up new ideas.

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When Will Digital Money Follow Digital Attention? Eventually....

When Will Digital Money Follow Digital Attention? Eventually....

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There is a simple premise in marketing that money follows attention. Each new medium from newspapers to magazines to radio to television has created new opportunities for marketers to reach people; and money as in advertising usually follows.

Kevin Kelly, the well known technologist and editor from Wired wrote an outstanding article in Technology Review about this and I highly recommend the quick read. He has also blogged about it here.

Essentially, he maps media consumption and suggests that we're in a transition period and while television dominates attention and dollars today that there is an increase in Internet and that money follows attention--eventually.

So the question is for health care companies is if you know that your customers are going online whether it's consumers or health care professionals what are you doing to reinvent so that you can capture attention in the future? Because when the money follows, you want to make sure you have a plan....to capture and engage.

Image via: www.technologyreview.com

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Three Things You Must Do When Creating a Digital/ Social Marketing Strategy

Three Things You Must Do When Creating a Digital/ Social Marketing Strategy

Simple title to this blog, right? I think strategy is actually pretty simple. 

It's the execution that gets a little tricky.

So, when it comes to developing your digital or social media strategy, keep it simple and remember these three things:

1. Identify and understand what your company needs to do to be successful.  Consider your customer, the channel and what your customer wants from you that will ultimately make you successful.

2. Communicate that strategy to your stakeholders so that THEY understand what your company needs to do. This must be simple and easy to understand  so they allow you to move forward.

3. And when you get permission, how will you actually implement that plan. This is usually the tactical plan and roadmap for how you will get there and what good looks like in the end.

If you develop strategy, that's your job. Pretty simple right?

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Why Sheer Will Makes or Breaks Rx/Dx Social Media

Why Sheer Will Makes or Breaks Rx/Dx Social Media

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Just a quick thought here, but it was a pleasure to have the opportunity to speak at the PRSA Health Academy last week with John Luginbill, CEO of The Heavyweights and author of the great blog Turn Up Your Volume .

Judging by some of the great dialogue it appears that there is still a lot of work to be done to drive social media and digital marketing forward.

All I can say is that I think it comes down to sheer will and want to. If there is enough will to succeed and perseverance then there will be success.

Unlike the Woody Allen quote, "80 percent is showing up." Success in social media is in that last 20 percent, which translates to sheer will.

I am always happy to talk about strategy, because that is really the easy part. What separates good from great social media is outstanding execution and consistency. And that, dear readers, takes sheer will.



Image via: chinwag.com

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The Intangibles

The Intangibles

Via Seth Godin, a great post about intangibles in a service business. I view this from being on the service buying side frequently. Service providers would do themselves a service by printing this post and placing it in a visible place near their work space.

It also reminded me of Steven Covey's The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and in particular
Think Win/Win describes an attitude whereby mutually beneficial solutions are sought that satisfy the needs of oneself, or, in the case of a conflict, both parties involved.

and

Synergize describes a way of working in teams. Apply effective problem solving. Apply collaborative decision making. Value differences. Build on divergent strengths. Leverage creative collaboration. Embrace and leverage innovation. It is put forth that when synergy is pursued as a habit, the result of the teamwork will exceed the sum of what each of the members could have achieved on their own. “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”