Docs Like Online Info

Docs Like Online Info

Speaking of hockey stick growth. Docs going online is also growing astronomically. The key is to provide the right info at the right time, which in this case happens to be at their convenience.

Via Medical Marketing & Media

Sixty-seven percent of physicians had a positive attitude toward electronic promotional activities, up from 62% a year ago, according to an SDI study.

Additionally, 73% of the physicians surveyed for SDI's ePromotion Annual Study 2008 said pharma's electronic promotional activities (or ePromotion) were equal or superior to traditional face-to-face encounters.

“Through ePromotion, physicians have more time to review product information and review disease state information at their own convenience – at night time or on the weekends,” said Heather Alba, senior manager, promotional audits at SDI.



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Online Influence

Online Influence

I see tons of metrics, analytics and research everyday. Everything interactive is going up like a hockey stick. Here is the one metric that you need to know.

84%of people are influenced by online customer reviews.

"Consumers are increasingly turning to online customer reviews to help them make buying decisions, according to the latest survey from Opinion Research Corporation. A large proportion, 84%, said that browsing reviews influenced their decision on whether or not to purchase a product or service"
I don't care what kind of product you sell, what audiences you need to influence or how complex your marketing segments. If you are not addressing this by engaging in conversation, nurturing your customers and providing value to them--online--you are in trouble.





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Atlas Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged

I saw an article on CNN about the famous (infamous) novel by Ayn Rand called Atlas Shrugged that indicates that in this economic situation that sales have taken off in the last 18 months. I distinctly recall a similar article back in the late 1990s/early 2000s saying the same thing. I remember this because I actually went out and bought the book and had a heck of time slogging through it. So much so that I went and borrowed the book on tape from my brother. That proved to be futile too. My attention span hasn't improved any over the last 8 years either so I don't think I am going to read it now, but what has struck me is that it soared to popularity during the dot-com era when great sums of money were being made, companies were going public and it was a general period of well-being. Now, we're in a period of economic uncertainty and it's popular, that polarity is very interesting to me.

The basic premise and theory is based on a free-market philosophy and objectivism. Interesting because in good times it touches on the ability for man to pursue happiness or "rational selfishness" and in bad times when it comes to keeping government out of labor.

I don't have a grand conclusion but I do find it interesting that a single book can be tied to to such opposite economic eras in a 10 year time span, but it proves a few things that will endure and that is self-preservation and the pursuit of success and by default money. Regardless of the economic situation, there will always be money to be made....

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Bobby Knight

Bobby Knight

Via Deadspin



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Twitter + Doctors = Real Time Monitoring?

Twitter + Doctors = Real Time Monitoring?

I am a fan of Twitter if only because I love to soak up information and distill into solutions. Whether it's reading magazines, blogs, or diving into Social Media I think he who has the most information usually wins. Twitter provides a decisive advantage in that regard.

The NYT has an article on Twitter and Doctor's. It also plays nicely into the connected health discussion.

But taken collectively, the stream of messages can turn Twitter into a surprisingly useful tool for solving problems and providing insights into the digital mood. By tapping into the world’s collective brain, researchers of all kinds have found that if they make the effort to dig through the mundane comments, the live conversations offer an early glimpse into public sentiment — and even help them shape it...
...Pairing sensors with Twitter leads some to think Twitter could be used to send home security alerts or tell doctors when a patient’s blood sugar or heart rate climbs too high. In the aggregate, such real-time data streams could aid medical researchers.
This is an interesting development, but really, until a Doctor gets reimbursed how much will this take off? It will but it will need some time. However, if a son, daughter or caregiver can be notified if someone falls down, doesn't wake up or has low blood glucose via a sensor and an alert--that would provide real value.

image via hongkiat.com

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Check This Too

Check This Too

While I am in the mood, check this out as well. I could hit repeat on this for hours.



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Landslide

Landslide

I was listening to Stevie Nicks sing Crash by DMB and this came to mind. I first heard this in college when the Smashing Pumpkins released it as a B-side on an album. Billy Corgan does it some justice, but not with the emotion Stevie packs. I would listen to her sing the phone book.



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Digital Docs and Smartphones

Digital Docs and Smartphones

Via Medical Marketing & Media:

This may be a little misleading and/or bullish. I get that docs are using smart phones, but really docs are consumers too when they aren't in an office--I know a few so I think I can speak to that with some credibility. The real question is whether they are actually using their phones in their practice?

I say that until they figure out a way to really reimburse for the always on, email, twittering, etc that it will remain a nice to have and not a have to have. Just because a few docs they interview downloaded the ePocrates app from iTunes doesn't mean the world is changing--yet.

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Mobile Medical Apps Taking Off

Mobile Medical Apps Taking Off

Via mobihealthnews.com

Medical Apps on the rise.

According to a report by Ben Lorca over at O’Reilly Radar, out of the 20 categories of iPhone applications, the “Medical” category has added the third most new applications in the past three months. The number of medical applications for the iPhone grew almost 133 percent during the period. The “Books” and “Travel” categories took the first and second places for most new apps added during the past 12 weeks. The medical category now holds 1.1 percent of the iPhone’s applications marketshare.
Saw that coming a mile away. These first gen medical apps most likely fall into the nice to have category but as technology advances these will advance connected health initiatives and provide real value and outcomes.

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We Need Alot More of This!

We Need Alot More of This!

Article from Deadspin.com

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Facebook Goes to Europe

Facebook Goes to Europe

Facebook has been popular in the US for quite awhile, but growth is now coming from Europe. This is an interestng development from a marketing perspective to really have a global platform. Social media marketers--take note.

Via MarketingVox

Facebook logged 275 million global visitors in February 2009 and has catapulted to the #6-ranked online property worldwide, a 75% increase over the same period last year, according to data from comScore's World Metrix service.

In addition to growing quickly, Facebook's European audience is also highly engaged, comScore added, noting that the average European user spends three hours per month on the site. Moreover, in February 2009, Facebook accounted for 4.1% of all minutes spent online in Europe. This compares with a year ago, when Facebook accounted for only 1.1% minutes. Facebook also accounts for a 30.4% of minutes spent in the social networking category, up from 12.3% a year earlier.

Related article on top social media sites, here.

An overwhelming majority (88%) of marketers in a recent survey say they are now using some form of social media to market their business, though 72% of those using it say they have only been at it a few months or less, according to a social media study by Michael Stelzner, sponsored by the upcoming Social Media Success Summit 2009 (via MarketingCharts).

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FDA Provides "Guidance" on Internet Marketing

FDA Provides "Guidance" on Internet Marketing

Late last week the FDA provided some guidance on Internet marketing. While I have seen a fair amount of uproar regarding the lack of clarity in the guidance, I think workable solutions can be found.

Via the WSJ:
There’s no question the Food and Drug Administration is moving to crack down on drug-company advertising appearing on the Internet, issuing warning letters to 14 companies recently. But just how the companies are supposed to comply isn’t clear, writes the New York Times.

I wrote in a previous post about an excellent interview eyeonfda.com did with the FDA. It is linked here.

When it comes to Internet marketing in general I think the FDA is asking for some common sense in marketing practices and to take all precaution to provide appropriate disclaimer information. Regardless of the medium the message is the same. You must provide as much information as possible so the risk information is available to the consumer. Do you think they want to play the police or they have to play the police because marketers stretch the guardrails provided. Of course FDA doesn't provide definite rules, because if they did then people would find a way to get around them.

However, it is nearly impossible to provide risk info in a text search ad. Let me rephrase that--it is impossible. Here some decisiveness from the FDA is needed and since the FDA is under the first "digital POTUS" it makes sense to me that they provide some clear guidance and establish new rules that take the unique elements of marketing via the Internet into account versus modifying TV/Print guidelines to the Internet.

Here are a few clear examples of how disclaimer info is provided in commercials. If you have seen the recent Yaz commercial that basically says, "yes, we tried to skirt the rules and we got caught" or the Abilify "if you listen carefully to what this drug could do to you then you may be less depressed."







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R.I.P. Harry Kalas

R.I.P. Harry Kalas

Having grown up in South Bend, Indiana and being a Notre dame fan certain football memories are indelibly printed in my memory. Gathering autographs from the players at the annual Blue & Gold game, selling programs as a kid at gate 4 for a few years and being in the student section when Pat Terrell knocked down the 2 point conversion attempt and Notre Dame beat Miami in the infamous 1988 "Catholics v Criminals" game.

Another memory is watching the game replays on Sunday mornings on TV with Harry Kalas making the call. His voice and cadence is unforgettable. I associate ND football in many respects with his voice. God Bless you, Harry Kalas, rest in peace.




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Self-Explanatory

Self-Explanatory


Via gapingvoid.com

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Interactive Potpouri

Interactive Potpouri

The winds are shifting. There has been quite a bit of news coming out lately on the Rx/Dx and interactive fronts lately.

FDA and Search Engine Marketing via NYT:

The Food and Drug Administration ordered 14 drug makers to stop using what it called misleading ads on Internet search engines. The agency faulted the companies for failing to identify product names and side effects in sponsored search results, according to its Web site
Rx/Dx Going to Digital
Consumer marketers aren't exactly turning off the TV just yet, but with budgets tightening, blockbusters going off-patent and DTC TV in disrepute, they are spending more time on YouTube and Facebook.
Bend But Don't Break

Why the recession is affecting your work and why is now a good time to take a risk.

This unnamed project has got me thinking a lot about risk-taking. Todd Defren published a wonderful post on his blog a few weeks ago about how adversity (i.e., the recession), pushes people to break the mold and do things they would ordinarily not do. He urged readers to “take a gamble” and if it fails, one can “always blame the recession.”
Reckitt-Benckiser is shifting media to online--20M large!

"Reckitt-Benckiser will cap off its fifth straight year of organic sales growth with a new recession-approved media strategy: moving TV dollars to online video.

The company plans to shift an estimated $20 million in TV ad dollars to the web for more than 15 of its brands, including Lysol, Air Wick, Mucinex, Finish and Clearasil. The strategic shift is significant for the company, which has traditionally spent upward of 90% of its $475 million measured-media budget on TV, and less than $1 million in measured spending on the web in 2008, according to TNS Media Intelligence. Even though its 2008 internet advertising through the first half was already double its full-year internet spending in 2007, it was still only 1% of media spending.

Good move. CPG usually leads, Rx follows and Dx is trailing....



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Social Media 200 via Logic + Emotion
Mr. Obvious Award

Mr. Obvious Award

You know, I think this Internet thing is going to stick around.

I want to start the official Rx/Dx Mr. Obvious awards for very time I read an article about Rx/Dx companies moving online that talks about the value of online. This is beginning to feel very similar to physicians going online. It's the overnight trend that has unfolded over the last 8 years or so.

The inaugural winner is Jonathon Mack at DMNews. It reads March 2009, but it would have read the same in 2006.
Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs may be some of the most visible products when it comes to TV and other mass-media ads. After all, who doesn't regularly see advertising for common pain relievers, allergy medicines or weight-loss aids? But while most OTC drug marketers still sink most of their bud­gets in mass-media channels such as TV and print, direct marketing, particularly online, has become a very viable option as budgets slim down.
"..particularly online, has become a very viable option as budgets slim down." No kidding.
“We're still seeing clients spend more than 90% of their budgets on TV,” says Mike Dennelly, director of digital marketing at agency G2, which works with several top OTC brands. “But the good news for direct marketers is that as TV becomes less and less effective in terms of getting people to go to the store and buy a product, targeted direct marketing is going to be increasing its share within our clients' budgets.”
90% of budgets on TV? Who? Where? Please tell me. It makes me realize the gap there is in digital strategy and I don't even see that gap being filled by agencies. Even if I am forgiving, I'd say that selling the benefits and value proposition needs more work--everywhere.

Here is a YouTube clip of Bob & Tom's very funny Mr. Obvious bits.



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Check Out the New Continua Web Site

Check Out the New Continua Web Site

The new Continua Health Alliance Web site launched last week in time for a summit in Barcelona, Spain.

Check out the new site and stay tuned as it evolves. It only seems natural to me that an Alliance built on technology and interoperability leverage the Internet as a primary communication channel.

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Introducing....Online Care

Introducing....Online Care

I'd like to propose that adoption of technology in health care delivery may be advanced if everyone could agree on some common nomenclature. For the love, I have heard it called a million different things.

Here is one man's perspective on "Online Care" from Connected-Health.org. By the way, I am partial to connected health as a term. Here are some previous posts.

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800# Gorilla Part II

800# Gorilla Part II

As follow-up to a previous post about the 800# gorilla that is Wal-Mart entering the EMR fray, I came across this post from the firm Software Advice for Electronic Health Records.

They go a few levels deeper than my simple reporting on the topic and posit, and accurately so, that Wal-Mart getting into EMRs isn't the boon that you may think. I happen to agree having been on the delivery side to healthcare for a decade, the last mile is always the toughest and despite the attention and momentum, that doesn't change because Wal-Mart decides to get involved.

I can imagine the hoots and hollers in the eClinicalWorks office after the deal was done, and it may make some sales guys' quarter, but I will be waiting and watching to see how it may or may not impact actual delivery to the physician.

Wal-Mart is savvy and scary smart in terms of their analysis of data, customer trends and squeezing costs out of the supply chain. They may be holding an ace up their sleeve that I can't see, but my guess is that in the short-term it is a well timed move to engender good will, some foot traffic, PR and potentially be a component of a longer term play.

Here is a brief excerpt and be sure to check out the above link for a well-done analysis of the execution side.

Furthermore, we do see some very real sales and services challenges arising from this partnership. Simply put: sophisticated, $25,000 EMR systems don’t sell themselves. Get a Wal-Mart “greeter” involved and things could get ugly. Wal-Mart has already stumbled a bit trying to support the relatively complex sale of iPhones. EMRs are a far more complex sale. My mind goes to the horribly awkward image of a brilliant, yet intolerant, cardiologist interrogating a greeter about eCW functionality. The mismatch of intellect and clinical expertise could be incendiary.

A $25,000 EMR is a “considered purchase”; for example, a physician practice needs to consider if the system meets their functionally requirements, integrates to other systems (e.g. RHIOs or diagnostic systems) or qualifies for subsidies such as the recent economic stimulus package. eCW certainly does meet many, many providers’ needs; however, a physician will not likely buy the system if there isn’t a highly qualified representative available to give them comfort through a consultative sales process.

Sam’s Club has over 600 locations, which is almost how many employees eCW has. It is highly unlikely that Wal-Mart or eCW would be able to staff up fast enough or effectively enough to provide sales support across a majority of these locations. Nor does that level of staffing seem efficient; I doubt there would be enough physicians coming through Sam’s Club door to keep that staff busy.




Video from Software Advice.

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